The Art of Travel

If we find poetry in the service station and the motel, if we are drawn to the airport or the train carriage, it is perhaps because, despite their architectural compromises and discomforts, despite their garish and harsh lighting, we implicitly feel that these isolated places offer us a material setting for an alternative to the selfish ease, the habits of confinement of the ordinary, rooted world.

The Art of Travel, Page 58

This book is for any person who has ever traveled for any length of time. It takes a deeper look at the motives, inspiration, and feelings that go into travel. And even more than that, you learn a lot about all of the good that comes from travel.


This book hit a chord with me. So many of the feelings I have towards travel and the soapboxes I will stand on when it comes to travel were put into words in this book.
Fun note, I purchased my copy at the cutest bookshop in the cutest little town/movie set last summer when I was in Florida. I picked it up while browsing the travel section not knowing much about the book or the author. When I went to he counter to purchase it, every employee  told me how much I would love the writing style and subtle humor in this book. They were absolutely right! Such a good souvenir.

In the more fugitive, trivial association of the word exotic, the charm of a certain place arrises from the simple idea of novelty and change -from finding camels where at home there are horses, for example, or unadorned apartment buildings where at home there are pillared ones. But there may be a more profound pleasure as well: we may value foreign elements not only because they are new but because they seem to accord more faithfully with our identity and commitments than anything our homeland can provide. I picked this book up at a little bookshop in Seaside, Florida last summer. When I when to the counter to purchase it, all the ladies that worked there were excited and had such great things to say about it.

The Art of Travel, Page 77

This is one I definitely suggest you pick up for yourself. It’s worth getting a copy to add to your personal library too.

 

Advertisements

Join the Conversation & Share a Comment

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s